Naugatuck High School Renovation Question and Answers

Posted by Bob on September 27, 2011 under Daily Blogs, Naugatuck High School Renovation | Be the First to Comment

Naugatuck voters will be asked to vote on a bond authorization to completely renovate Naugatuck High School (“NHS”) on November 8, 2011.  Undoubtedly, residents have many questions regarding the project.  The following is list of questions and answers that attempts to provide as much information as possible about the project:

What is the purpose of the NHS Renovate-as-New Project?

The purpose of the project is to completely renovate NHS to modern educational and architectural standards.  A 2007 Kaestle Boos Associates, Inc. study described deficiencies in the core infrastructure at the high school. The study referenced numerous settlement cracks, masonry and joint deficiencies and support issues that were in need of address.  In addition to the items referenced in the Kaestle Boos analysis, several other areas of the high school will need to be repaired in the coming years.  Health, safety, building and Americans with Disability Act (“ADA”) accessibility code compliance improvements are needed throughout the building, including but not limited to classrooms, corridors, locker rooms and the auditorium. Many windows and frames need to be replaced with the corresponding paint removal. Poorly drained athletic and marching band fields and spectators walking on the same pool deck with swimmers have been problems for many years.  The “Renovate-as-New” Project would completely repair and refurbish all aspects of NHS.

What is the difference between Renovate-as-New and New Construction?

The concept of Renovate-as-New is to completely refurbish an existing school facility to modern standards and codes. The process is an alternative, in this case less expensive, to building a new school at the same or different site.  The State of Connecticut recently reduced Naugatuck’s reimbursement rate for new school construction from seventy five (75%) percent to sixty five (65%) percent.  The Borough’s reimbursement rate for renovation projects remains seventy five (75%) percent.

All systems have to be designed and certified for a twenty (20) year, life cycle to qualify for a “Renovate-as-New” project. In addition, the legislation that governs the “Renovate-as-New” process requires that a municipality and/or school district prove that the renovation is less expensive than building a new facility in order to qualify for full reimbursement.

What is the cost of the NHS Renovate-as-New Project?

The Joint Board of Finance and Mayor and Burgesses (“Joint Boards”) authorized the Borough to bond EIGHTY MILLION NINE HUNDRED EIGHTY THREE THOUSAND FIVE HUNDRED EIGHTY TWO and 00/100THS  ($80,983,582.00) DOLLARS.  That would be the maximum amount that a Building Committee could spend on the project without further authorization from the Joint Boards.  The Borough’s cost, after state reimbursement, would range from TWENTY FOUR MILLION NINE HUNDRED THIRTY FOUR THOUSAND SEVEN HUNDRED TWO and 38/100THS ($24,934,702.38) DOLLARS and THIRTY SEVEN MILLION FOUR HUNDRED SIXTEEN THOUSAND NINE HUNDRED FORTY TWO and 09/100THS ($37,416,942.09) DOLLARS.

What is state reimbursement?

The State of Connecticut reimburses municipalities a certain percentage for costs associated with school building projects.  The reimbursement rates for specific towns are determined by a formula based on various socio-economic indicators.  The state does not reimbursement every repair, renovation and/or construction at the same rate.  Some costs are not eligible for reimbursement while others only received a portion of the maximum reimbursement percentage.  The state also reduces reimbursement rates if a facility is larger, based on square footage and population projections, than state guidelines.  Towns may request a waiver from the reduction in full state reimbursement if square footage limits exceed student projections.

Why is there a big fluctuation between the Borough’s local portion of the cost?

NHS current footprint exceeds the State of Connecticut’s square footage guidelines of approximately 236,635 square feet based on student population projections over the next eight (8) years.  The structures at NHS total about 304,181 square feet.  This would reduce Naugatuck’s reimbursement rate from seventy five (75%) percent to approximately fifty eight (58%) percent.  Naugatuck would have to seek a waiver of that reduction from state officials.  A reduction in state reimbursement would also apply if the Borough constructed a new high school of similar size.  A school construction and/or renovation project must be approved by public referendum before a municipality can apply for a waiver from any deviation from state square footage requirements.

How long would the NHS Renovate-as-New Project take to complete?

If the bond is authorized at the November 8, 2011, referendum, it is estimated that construction would not begin until the Fall of 2012.  Construction is scheduled to be completed by the Fall of 2015.

How are payments on bonds made?

The permanent construction bonds would not become due and payable until the project is complete.

How would the project be financed during construction?

The project would be financed during the construction phase using bond anticipation notes.  It it anticipated that the bond anticipation notes will be structured so that primarily interest will be paid during the construction phase of the project.

What is a bond anticipation note?

According to Investopedia.com, a bond anticipation note is “a short-term interest bearing security issued in the anticipation of larger future bond issues.”  Further explanation states that “Bond anticipation notes are smaller, short-term bonds issued by governments and corporations.  Knowing that the proceeds of the larger future issue will cover the anticipation notes, the issuing bodies use the notes as short-term financing.”  (www.investopedia.com)

How much more in taxes will this mean to the average homeowner?

If the referendum is approved, the Borough’s obligations to repay the bonds will increase gradually throughout the construction cycle.  While it is impossible to know all the other factors associated that determine the Borough’s mill rate, the following documents provide an analysis of the costs associated with the NHS renovation project:

Debt Management Plan – NHS Project Plan Costs;

Existing and Proposed Debt Service / Debt Management Plan – NHS Renovation Project; and

Existing and Proposed Debt Service / Annual Change in Debt Service including NHS Renovation Project.

What would the interest rates associated with the bond financing?

The current interest rates for the municipal bonds is approximately three and one half (3 1/2%) percent.  The actual interest rate on the project would not be fixed until construction is completed.

What is the Borough of Naugatuck’s bond rating?

The Borough of Naugatuck’s municipal bond rating for general obligation bonds is currently AA-.  Both Standard and Poor’s and Moody’s upgraded the Borough’s bond rating from A+ to AA- in 2010.  The Standard and Poor’s 2010 Summary for the Borough of Naugatuck’s general obligation bonds can be viewed here.

What is a municipal bond rating?

A municipal bond rating assesses the credit worthiness of a municipality.  It is commonly compared as the municipal equivalent of a personal credit score.

What is the current status of the Borough’s bonded indebtedness?

The Borough’s bonded indebtedness is relatively low at the current time.  A list of outstanding obligations and their respective maturity date can be viewed here.

Would NHS remain operational during the construction?

Yes.  Construction will be completed in phases.  If the bond is authorized at the November 8, 2011, referendum, NHS will remain a functioning high school during construction. The Building Committee, design team, construction manager and school officials will jointly discuss and develop a plan so the school can function with minimal disruption during the renovations.  Flexible space will allow administration to offer the same curriculum that the current schedule provides. Fall athletics would likely be disrupted for one (1) season while athletic fields are being repaired and renovated. Previous renovations to fields in the late 1980′s relocated certain Fall sports competitions to Breen South and Municipal Stadium in Waterbury.  An exact plan for the one (1) Fall season will be determined.

Would there be shortened schedules during the renovation?

No.  NHS will remain a functioning high school on full schedule during construction.

Will there be enough space in NHS to accommodate the renovation and operate on full schedule?

Yes.  There will be sufficient flexibility with regard to space to accommodate the renovation and operate on full schedule.

Would freshman sports be eliminated?

No.  Freshman sports will not be eliminated during the renovation period.  Freshman sports were not eliminated during the previous renovation to the athletic fields which took place in the late 1980′s.

Would portable classrooms be used?

No.  Portable classrooms will not be needed during the renovation.  NHS will remain a functioning high school during construction.  Adequate space currently exists and will remain during the renovation as a result of flexible space.

What are the educational benefits of the Renovate-as-New Project?

Educational specifications have been drafted over the course of several months. Former administrator Carl Trombley was commissioned to lead a team of educational officials in creating specifications for a building most conducive to a twenty-first (21st) century, learning facility.  Many of the classrooms do not have the technological infrastructure to support large-scale wireless communications and “smart-board” technology.  Many still use the traditional blackboards. A complete renovation would upgrade the technology itself within classrooms and common learning areas.  The new classrooms will provide the capacity to allow computer and online learning to flourish as technology advances.  In addition, there are plans to install such learning environments as a greenhouse, a child-development center and upgraded music and drama facilities in various locations in the building.

What will happen to recently completed upgrades at NHS?

Certain repairs and upgrades have been made to NHS during recent years such as the installation of solar panels on the roof, addition to the cafeteria, renovated science labs and restoration of the auditorium.  Any such repairs that have been made will not be redone during the renovation.  Any recently repaired and/or new item will remain intact provided there is code compliance.  Recently renovated science (biology) labs and the cafeteria comply with applicable codes.  There may be additional work required to facilitate new mechanical, electrical and sprinkler systems.  See individual items below.

Did we not just install a new roof at NHS with solar panels?

Yes.  The solar panels are functioning well and returning power to the grid.  The solar panels will remain and very little work is needed on the NHS roof that is not related to chimneys and/or the connection to the masonry.  The roof warranty currently in place will need to be extended.  A waiver may be sought due to the fact that the roof and corresponding solar panels were only installed a few years ago.

Did we not just renovate the Davis Auditorium?

Yes, to a degree.  Local, state and community dollars helped to replace the seats and some floor tiles in the auditorium and renovate the adjacent restrooms.  All of these recent repairs and/or additions will remain.  There are still, however, several issues that were not address due to cost.  The auditorium does not presently comply with Americans with Disability (“ADA”) code and egress requirements.  In order to qualify a Renovate-as-New project, an entire school must comply with all the applicable code requirements.  It is planned that the auditorium layout will change and its seating capacity will be reduced.  Recently installing seating will be removed and re-installed in a new layout.  It is planned that a new sprinkler system will be installed.  It is also planned that the state sound system and theatrical lighting will be refurbished.

How will the proposed renovation impact the seating capacity of the Davis Auditorium?
If the referendum is approved, it is anticipated that the seating capacity of the Davis Auditorium will be reduced from approximately nine hundred fifty (950) to approximately six hundred seventy four (674), which will include four (4) handicapped-accessible seats.

Did we not just renovate new science labs?

Yes.  Certain science labs that were renovated will not need to be replaced.  Chemistry labs have not been recently renovated.

Did we not just complete an addition to the cafeteria?

Yes.  The recent addition to the cafeteria meets applicable codes.  Some changes have been requested pursuant to the educational specifications, but it is anticipated that most of the work recently completed will remain.

Did we not just add new lockers to the Sophomore (Goodyear) House?

Yes.  New lockers that have been recently installed will remain and/or be reused once the renovation project is completed.

Will the houses be reconfigured?

Educational specifications were drafted by school administrators and approved by the Board of Education.  The educational specifications can be viewed here.  While certain classrooms and disciplines will be relocated into more convenient and educationally consistent areas, the three (3) main houses – Freshman (Castle), Sophomore (Goodyear) and Junior/Senior (Judd) will remain.

Will the names of various components of NHS change?

No.  All current names shall be retained.  For example: The Davis Auditorium will remain the Davis Auditorium and the Mariano Gym will remain the Mariano Gym.

Will there be additional parking spaces at NHS?

No.  The amount of land at NHS will not change and there will be no additional parking spaces of any significance added.

Will there be better traffic flow?

Yes.  A bus loop will be created that should allow buses to exit the building in less than five (5) minutes.  A visitor pick-up / drop-off area has been proposed with separate access points from the bus loop.  A second and safe means of vehicular egress is proposed for the Eastern exit.

Is there any asbestos remaining in NHS?

All areas of NHS will be tested and all hazardous material identified, including asbestos, will be removed.

Will sprinkler systems be installed and/or updated if the NHS Renovate-as-New Project is approved at referendum?

Yes.  If the referendum is approved, fire sprinkler systems will be installed and/or brought to applicable codes in all areas of the building structure.

Will air conditioning be installed if the NHS Renovate-as-New Project is approved at referendum?

Air conditioning currently exists in the Sophomore (Goodyear) House, Freshman (Castle) House, Resource Center and other isolated areas of NHS.  The Building Committee will investigate installing air conditioning to all areas of NHS.  The educational specifications approved by the Board of Education include the installation of air conditioning to all structural areas of NHS.  The addition of air conditioning will be considered as an alternate and incorporated depending on the bid results.

Will new windows be installed if the NHS Renovate-as-New Project is approved at referendum?

Yes.  New, insulated glass windows will be installed as well as the frames that support the windows.

Will renovations improve energy efficiency if the NHS Renovate-as-New Project is approved at referendum?

Yes.  State of Connecticut school facility requirements mandate that all projects exceeding FIVE MILLION and 00/100THS ($5,000,000.00) DOLLARS comply with “high performance” building standards.  Part of such compliance requirements includes installation of energy efficiency systems throughout a structure as well as the use of certain recycled materials.

Will any changes be made to the NHS Resource Center if the NHS Renovate-as-New Project is approved at referendum?

Yes.  The NHS Resource Center is relatively large for a modern media facility.  If the NHS Renovate-as-New Project is approved at referendum, the square footage of the Resource Center would be reduced and excess space will be made available for light-appropriate art classrooms.

Are there any other new features that would be created if the NHS Renovate-as-New Project is approved at referendum?

Yes.  It is anticipated that if the NHS Renovate-as-New Project is approved at referendum, an outdoor greenhouse, child development area with play-scape, natatorium (swimming observatory area), new administrative offices, security features, state-of-the-art auditorium, state-of-the art music rooms and fitness center/dance studio/weight room will be created using new and/or renovated space.

Is it possible to install generators at NHS that would allow for better sheltering during emergency situations if the NHS Renovate-as-New Project is approved at referendum?

Yes.  If the NHS Renovate-as-New Project is approved at referendum, the Building Committee will investigate if generator power can be installed to certain areas of NHS.  While it might be impractical and cost-prohibitive to provide alternative power to all of NHS, it is anticipated that the Building Committee will research if certain areas could be equipped with generator power to increase sheltering options.  It is anticipated that the Building Committee will also investigate possible, alternative financing sources for generator power from emergency management agencies on the state and federal level.

Will security be addressed at NHS?

Yes.  The proposed renovation includes relocating the main offices from the back of the building to the front by enclosing the patio.  The main entrance and all other access points of entry and exit will be equipped with modern means of security verification technology.

Has the possibility of building a new high school been researched?

Yes.  The Long Term School Facility Planning Committee researched multiple scenarios involving a new high school.  It was determined that building a new high school was not a good option for the following reasons: (i) cost; (ii) the lack of available land that was did not have the potential to generate commercial tax revenue; and (iii) building a new high school with the current square footage of NHS would exceed state guidelines and likely reduce the reimbursement rate to the Borough.  The following are the cost projections for five (5) different options:

What is the Long Term School Facility Planning Committee?

The Long Term School Facility Planning Committee (“LTSFPC”) is an ad-hoc group appointed by the Board of Mayor and Burgesses.  The Committee’s charge is to formulate a facilities plan for the Naugatuck School District that can be implemented by the year 2025.  The Mission Statement of the LTSFPC can be viewed here.  In addition to the recommendations made regarding the NHS renovations, the LTSFPC is researching options for the Kindergarten through Eight Grade (“K-8″) portion of Naugatuck’s School District.  The members of the LTSFPC can be viewed here.

Why did the LTSFPC recommend renovations to NHS before completing the entire plan for the K-8 portion of the District?

The LTSFPC researched the significant needs required at NHS.  After determining that building a new high school was not the best option, the LTSFPC researched the renovate-as-new concept.  It was ultimately decided that pursuing a renovation of NHS was the appropriate beginning of implementing improvements to the entire district.

What would it cost to just complete needed structural repairs and code compliance?

Unless ignoring the asset is an option, work will need to be done to maintain NHS.  Numerous settlement cracks, masonry and joint deficiencies and support issues need to be repaired.  Health, safety, building and Americans with Disability Act (“ADA”) accessibility code compliance improvements are needed throughout the building, including but not limited to classrooms, corridors, locker rooms and the auditorium. Many windows and frames need to be replaced with the corresponding paint removal.  It is estimated that the cost of such basic repairs could costs approximately FORTY SIX MILLION and 00/100THS ($46,000,000.00) DOLLARS.  It is estimated that the cost to the Borough for such repairs would be approximately TWENTY TWO MILLION and 00/100THS ($22,000,000.00) DOLLARS as many of these items are not reimbursed at the highest level if at all.

Can the Borough choose not to do all of the proposed repairs and just concentrate on the basics?

Yes.  Ultimately the scope of the repairs will be determined by the Building Committee.  If renovate-as-new project status is granted, a municipality is basically telling the State of Connecticut that the renovated facility is likely to function as an educational institution for the next twenty (20) years.  Pursuant to that requirement, a Renovate-as-New project must ensure that a facility meets compliance standards for ADA accessibility and ingress/egress as well as “High Performance” building standards.  If a choice is made to exclude particular items during the renovate-as-new process, a town may not return within a twenty (20) year period and receive any state reimbursement for such a repair and/or addition.  Therefore if a particular portion of work is not included in the renovation, Naugatuck would be required to pay for such a repair in the future without any state reimbursement for a twenty (20) year period.

Can the Borough choose to complete the renovate-as-new project without including the renovations to the athletic fields?

The Borough can choose to complete a Renovate-as-New project without including certain aspects of the currently-proposed project provided that it meets compliance standards for ADA accessibility and ingress/egress as well as “High Performance” building standards.  If the athletic fields are excluded, however, the Borough could not complete future repairs to said fields and receive any state reimbursement within the next twenty (20) years.

Can the Borough choose to complete the renovate-as-new project without including the renovations to the auditorium?

The Borough can choose to complete a Renovate-as-New project without including certain aspects of the currently-proposed project provided that it meets compliance standards for ADA accessibility and ingress/egress as well as “High Performance” building standards.  If the auditorium is excluded, however, the Borough could not complete future repairs to said auditorium and receive any state reimbursement within the next twenty (20) years.  Because the auditorium does not currently meet ADA accessibility and ingress/egress as well as “High Performance” building standards, the Borough would need to address such issues to be granted Renovate-as-New status is granted.

Can the Borough choose to complete the renovate-as-new project without including the renovations to the pool?

The Borough can choose to complete a Renovate-as-New project without including certain aspects of the currently-proposed project provided that it meets compliance standards for ADA accessibility and ingress/egress as well as “High Performance” building standards.  If the pool/natatorium is excluded, however, the Borough could not complete future repairs to said auditorium and receive any state reimbursement within the next twenty (20) years.  Because the auditorium does not currently meet ADA accessibility and ingress/egress as well as “High Performance” building standards and requires new sprinkler systems, the Borough would need to address such issues to be granted Renovate-as-New status is granted.

Can the Borough choose to complete the renovate-as-new project without including the renovations to the locker rooms?

Yes.  If the locker rooms are excluded, however, the Borough could not complete future repairs to said locker rooms and receive any state reimbursement within the next twenty (20) years.  If no locker room additions are done, then existing locker spaces must be brought to compliance with ADA accessibility and ingress/egress as well as “High Performance” building standards and will require new sprinkler systems so that the project can be designated with Renovate-as-New status.

Why are the Board of Education offices being relocated to NHS?

There are multiple reasons.  Relocation the Board of Education (“BoE”) administrative office will help reduce the amount of square footage available at NHS that is over the state guidelines.  The current footprint of NHS is approximately three hundred four thousand one hundred eighty one (304,181 ft 2) square feet, while state guidelines recommend a school of approximately two hundred thirty six thousand six hundred thirty five (236,635 ft 2) square feet based on Naugatuck’s population projections over the next eight (8) years.  The state would reimburse Naugatuck approximately thirty seven and one half (37.5%) percent for renovations associated with relocating the BoE offices to NHS.   In addition, the Tuttle building presents logistical and technological obstacles to conducting modern office functions.  Lastly, relocating the BoE offices to NHS would improve communication between administrative staff, particularly with regard to special education.

If the BoE offices are relocated to NHS, what would happen to the Tuttle Building?

The Long Term School Facility Planning Committee has been charged with recommending a suitable re-purpose for any closed educational facility.  Roof repairs are currently needed at Tuttle.  The Tuttle property itself is currently restricted by deed, but could likely serve another municipal and/or public use.  The cost of any repairs needed could vary depending on how closely the Borough would like to replicate the original condition of the building.

If Naugatuck voters approve the bond authorization at referendum, who would oversee the design and construction of the renovations?

A Building Committee has been appointed by the Board of Mayor and Burgesses to oversee the design and construction of the NHS renovations.  The duties of the Building Committee would include but not be limited to: procuring an architectural design firm; overseeing the design of the project; determining the scope of the project; oversee the procurement of a construction manager; ensure educational needs are included in the design and implemented during construction; manage the budget with Borough Finance staff; and determine any change orders to the original design.

Who is on the Building Committee?

The Building Committee is comprised of the five (5) standing members of the Borough’s Five (5) Year Capital Committee and two (2) representatives representing education in our District.  The members are as follows:

  • Robert Neth, Chair – Burgess and Chair of Five (5) Year Capital Committee;
  • Cynthia Herb – Member of Five (5) Year Capital Committee and former Chair of the Board of Finance;
  • Kevin Knowles – Member of the Five (5) Year Capital Committee; Former State Representative and Former Deputy Mayor;
  • Raymond Lennon – Member of the Five (5) Year Capital Committee and Former Chair of the Board of Finance;
  • Wayne McAllister – Member of the Five (5) Year Capital Committee, Borough Comptroller and BoE Business Manager;
  • Charles Marenghi – Borough Educator and Vice-President of the Naugatuck Teachers League;
  • Janice Saam – Principal of Naugatuck High School.

All members of the Building Committee are Naugatuck residents.

Would local residents have the opportunity to work on the project?

Yes.  State and federal law dictate wage guidelines on large public projects, including school constructions and renovations. The Building Committee would have the option to consider any additional options that would provide preference to local workers.

How many jobs will be created by the proposed Renovate-as-New project?

Typically a project of the size and magnitude proposed will create between one hundred (100) and one hundred fifty (150) jobs.

What is the Five (5) Year Capital Committee?

The Five (5) Year Capital Committee is the committee appointed by the Board of Mayor and Burgesses to oversee bond projects in the Borough.  The Borough’s bond counsel provides professional assistance and instruction in compliance with legal requirements and proper accounting procedures.

Who is the architectural firm that has completed the initial services required to proceed with the NHS Renovate-as-New Project?

Kaestle Boos Associates, Inc.

How will the architectural firm be selected if the referendum is approved?

The Building Committee will issue a request for qualifications (“RFQ”) seeking an architectural firm for the entire project.

What are the renovations that would not be eligible for full, state reimbursement (75%) even if a waiver of the square footage requirements is successful?

The following project components are not eligible for full, state reimbursement (with maximum reimbursement levels):

  • Athletic Field Reconstruction (only 37.5% of approximately $3,177,057.00);
  • Synthetic Surface (0.0% of approximately $778,455.00);
  • Pool Natatorium (only 37.5% of approximately $3,094,816.00);
  • Portion of Indirect Costs (0.0% of approximately $1,381,062.00).

What are “Indirect Costs”?

According to the architects itemized projections, Indirect Costs are as follows:  Bond expenses, Survey/Design, Geo Tech Services, Third (3rd) Party Structural Review; Moving and Storage; Zoning and Wetlands; Traffic Study; Abatement Testing/Inspection; Construction Testing; Printing/Advertising; Commissioning; Final Cleaning; Miscellaneous; Builders Risk; Legal Fees; Furniture and Technology; and Architecture and Engineering Fees.

Why is a synthetic grass surface needed for field reconstruction?

Most high schools being built in Connecticut include at least one (1) synthetic grass surface for football and soccer use (Watertown most recently). Some high schools have installed synthetic grass surfaces completely separate from school construction and/or renovations (Wolcott, Pomperaug and Cheshire).  Synthetic grass surfaces allow constant play regardless of weather conditions and reduce the need for pesticides, fertilizer and water.  A quality and consistent playing surface at NHS will permit procuring regional and state events which produce both direct revenue to the school district and indirect revenue to the community.  It is anticipated that the installation of a synthetic surface will allow more frequent use by youth soccer, football and marching band groups.

Where would the synthetic surface be?

The synthetic grass field would be installed at the current location of the football field.  Both soccer and football games would be played on the upper field.  Handicapped-accessible seating would be installed to the grandstand, and visitor bleachers enhanced.  It is anticipated that an eight (8) lane track would be constructed around the soccer/football field.

Where would the baseball and softball fields be located?

The baseball field would be relocated to the Western side of the lower field (current soccer field) with home plate located approximately near the old Western ticket booth (that formerly served Mountview Plaza Traffic).  The new softball field would be installed at the Eastern portion of the lower field (current soccer field), with home plate located outside of the Southern end of the tennis courts.  Both the baseball and softball fields would have natural grass and clay surfaces.  It is anticipated that a multi-practice, natural grass practice field would overlap the outfields of the baseball and softball fields.

Would the drainage problems be resolved at both the upper and lower fields?

Yes.

What would happen to the upper, practice field?

The field would be renovated but remain natural grass.

What is a natatorium?

A natatorium is an observation area overlooking a swimming pool.

Why is a natatorium being proposed?

It is a violation of health and safety codes to have swimmers walking on a pool deck where spectators travel wearing street shoes.  The addition of a natatorium would allow spectators to observe pool meets without walking on the pool deck surface.

Would locker rooms be repaired?

Yes.  The current lockers rooms under the gym (boy’s locker rooms and weight rooms) contain numerous code violations, have poor ventilation and tight quarters.  If the referendum for the Renovate-as-New proposal is approved, the existing locker rooms in the lower floor will be completely abandoned and the area will not be accessible for any purpose.  It is anticipated that new locker rooms on the main level will be constructed.

Where would new locker rooms be located?

The women’s locker room would be renovated and new locker rooms would be constructed adjacent to the auxiliary (Girl’s) gym.

What would happen to the boys locker rooms currently located on the lower floor?

The space would be vacated and not accessible.

What renovations would be made to the NHS auditorium if the NHS Renovate-as-New Project is approved at referendum?

Any renovations made and/or new equipment installed during the Davis Auditorium Restoration Committee (“DARC”) process would be utilized.  Upgrades to the lighting and sound system and compliance with applicable health, safety and disability codes would be performed if the NHS Renovate-as-New Project is approved at referendum.  In addition, it is anticipated that the auditorium’s lobby and entrance/exits points would be enhanced.

Would seating capacity be reduced in the auditorium?

Yes.  Seating capacity would be reduced in the auditorium if the NHS Renovate-as-New Project is approved at referendum. Installation of handicapped-accessible seating would decrease the overall, seating capacity of the NHS auditorium. Seating capacity would still remain high for a high school of NHS’s size and accommodate academic specifications.

Would a renovated NHS still be available for use by the community if the NHS Renovate-as-New Project is approved at referendum?

Yes.  It is anticipated that the opportunities for use of the NHS building and grounds by the entire community would be significantly enhanced if the NHS Renovate-as-New Project is approved at referendum.

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